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    Half-Acre Homestead

Photos On the Road

Reconstructed chapel at Fort Ross, Russian fur trapping post in the 1800s

Straight-line eaves on old barns indicate solid foundations. This one on road from Navarro to Boonville

A Whole New Octave

Years ago I was in the Adolph Gasser photo store in SF and a bike messenger came in. He told the guy behind the counter he'd just had a baby. "It's a whole new octave, man," he said. (He was a musician.)
I think of this phrase whenever I'm about to change directions, like about now:
I feel like I've finished a cycle with my 7 building books, from Shelter in 1973, up through Small Homes in 2017, each book with over 1,000 photos. I'm working on a new book, to be called something like Handmade/Homemade: The Half-Acre Homestead. I ought to get it out by the end of 2018. Then a new direction.
Small books I have a bunch of maybe-not-for-prime-time books that I want to do. After publishing Driftwood Shacks, an 86-page digitally printed book, I realized that this and other books I want to do are for friends, probably not for bookstore distribution. I want to do these books without worrying about sales, "marketing." The next one, a shrunk-down copy of a scrapbook I put together 25 years ago, hand-lettered, hand-bound, original 11" by 14", 48 pages, called Pop's Diner, about a trip through the American southwest, hot springs --jeez, I've written this all before...us old guys...
I have 200-300,000 photos I've shot over the years. A great thing about Google Photos: you download all your photos with GPhotos, then you can go in and do a search for "barns," or "Baja" and GPhotos will come up with just those photos. Man! How does the computer tell a barn from a house? Beyond me.
Subjects of these books: barns, Baja California Sur, trips in Southeast Asia, motorcycles, facsimiles of scrapbooks I've put together over the years, and yes: architecture. Have I said this before?
I'm going to get the homestead book done and then do some of these smaller ones.

More Driftwood Shacks

After breakfast in Boonville, Louie and I drove through the giant redwoods back to the coast and went out to Navarro beach, a driftwood mecca. Here's the inside and outside of one of the shacks.
(I'm thinking of taking a 2-week trip up the coast in May, including a 3-day backpacking trip along The Loast Coast beach, photographing shacks -- and doing a larger driftwood book.)
Louie collected select pieces of driftwood to make a chair while I ran around shooting photos. Before we left I jumped into the Navarro river for a moment. The rivers up here are beautiful right now, plenty of water, and emerald green in between the rains…

3-Day Trip North Along Rainy Coast to Hang Out With Louie

I get inspired the minute I hit the road. The moving through space, the different places, different people. This time I'm driving my 19-year-old Mercedes 320E, a most unbelievably comfortable car that I bought for $3500, fixed it up, and am continually surprised and pleased by its features. I mean, I am not a Mercedes kind of guy, but mama mia, is this car great. I was on the verge of buying a Subaru Crosstrek, but have now decided to stick with the Mercedes until it dies. Luxury!
Hidden in the bushes along the coast...

A friend who has a home at Sea Ranch gave me a pass so I'm legal there. I swam in the pool yesterday. It's one of the good designs at Sea Ranch. Architecture can be so fine when done right. The pool is surrounded by a grassy berm, and water heated with solar panels (with backup propane). Dressing rooms wittily designed. No chlorine. No one else there on rainy day. Afterwards I skated for a while. I'm a bit creaky on the skateboard, still getting my chops back after a broken arm, then shoulder operation.

Titch's greenhouse at sunset

Redwoods Survive Fires

Out pretty deep in woods today. I often see fire-scarred redwoods; maybe they survive fires. Makes sense. It's been many years since there was a fire in these parts.
I'm heading up to Pt. Arena to visit my friend Louie tomorrow for a few days.

Bronze #starfish (about 4” diam.) on concrete bench outside #cliffhouse #sanfrancisco yesterday

Bronze #starfish (about 4” diam.) on concrete bench outside #cliffhouse #sanfrancisco yesterday

Rock=Crawling Toyota 4Runner

In Costco parking lot in Novato, Calif. last Friday. Makes me want to jump in and head for Baja…

#pacificheights #sanfrancisco today

#pacificheights #sanfrancisco today

#queenanne #carpentry #sanfrancisco near 2300 block of Fillmore. How many carpenters could build like this these days?

#queenanne #carpentry #sanfrancisco near 2300 block of Fillmore. How many carpenters could build like this these days?

Rainy Thursday #sanfrancisco 1823 Clement

Rainy Thursday #sanfrancisco 1823 Clement

Rib of Huge Blue Whale

Rib of 79 foot blue whale that washed ashore 9 months ago. It must be 25’ long. I’ll bet it weighs over 500 pounds.

Funky Old Yamaha

In San Francisco last Friday. It was bit rusty, but something about it was just right, like the poor old uncle of a Harley...

Monday Morning Fish Fry

On the Beach Reincarnation of the Whalebone Saloon, built a few years ago by Sean Hellfritsch and friends on a remote beach. It's at the base of a free-flowing creek that empties on to the beach, and has prolific watercress. 
Yesterday was a beautiful beach day, the calm before a week (hallelujah!) of storms and rains. I lay in the sun, ran a bit, jumped in the water, right back out -- brrr! Very few people on beach, one guy had a beautiful black piece of whale baleen he'd found. Later I came across what must have been a 25'-long whale rib, awesome to ponder the size of a creature with a rib of this size. This one, that had washed ashore in May, was a 79' blue whale.

Boogie Woogie At The Mall

Under the Golden Gate Bridge

From the top story of Fort Point, looking towards the hills of Marin. Click on photo to enlarge.

Fort Point, Under the Golden Gate Bridge

Note: Click on this image to get a much larger pic.
I often go under the bridge to check the waves. On Friday, they were hitting the seawall, with spray flying. I started talking to a park ranger, and he  told me to go inside the fort, and up to the top (four stories, cast iron staircases).
I grew up in San Francisco, I've been down there dozens of times, and I never knew you could go inside the fort. It's an amazing building, built in 1853-1861. It's open Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and well worth a visit. I'll post more photos in coming days. This was a thrill.

This got built in about an hour at the Concrete Boat pier south of Santa Cruz last week.

This got built in about an hour at the Concrete Boat pier south of Santa Cruz last week.